Nurse clothing in the civil war-Civil War Nurse Uniform

Civil War Nurses Uniform for Adults. Our Civil War period nurse uniform is made to honor those brave and dedicated women who followed in Ms. Our uniform is composed of a black dress with ecru collar, cuffs, over-apron, and nurse cap. This nurse costume would be less specific and used as a general Civil War volunteer nurse uniform. As we cut each costume when ordered and need to have the following size information:.

Nurse clothing in the civil war

Nurse clothing in the civil war

Nurse clothing in the civil war

Nurse clothing in the civil war

In her zeal to reduce suffering and death, Dix constantly prowled the hospitals. Back to List. Toward the end of the war, when someone complained about Bickerdyke to Sherman, he commented that she was the only person around who outranked him, and he suggested the complainer refer the matter to President Nurse clothing in the civil war Wsr. She reserved special vengeance for anyone she suspected of snitching supplies or delicacies she had set aside for the sick and wounded. Benilde Tower - Third Floor W.

Flattering haircuts for asian faces. Louisa May Alcott

In spite of her brusque and aggressive behavior, Bickerdyke gained the friendship jn a few high-ranking officers, among them Generals Linda blair celebrity challenge S. The demoralizing hospital diet of rancid pork and stale bread was quickly replaced by rice, Nurse clothing in the civil war, milk and chicken that Mother Angela procured and prepared herself. What civil war? True to her faith, Mother Angela served Union and Confederate soldiers with equal devotion. Many contrabands cheerfully worked hard for her, and, in turn, she fought for their fair treatment and taught them skills Nuree could use later in postwar America. Raised in Pennsylvania as a Quaker, Rebecca E. When the last Illinois man was discharged, Bickerdyke resigned from the Sanitary Commission to devote the rest of her life to her family and to charitable deeds. Cllothing the Lens: A History in Pictures. There were specialized Civil War dresses every occasion: mourning gowns, ball gowns, riding habits, etc. The establishment of these hospitals was a giant leap forward in medical care and provided many benefits.

Includes: Brown, zipper back dress with white red cross bib apron, matching armband and white civil war nurse hat.

  • What did the femal nurses wear during the civil war?
  • The Civil War womens clothing outfits worn by the female citizens of Gettysburg and Victorian women visiting after the battle are hard for us to imagine in the modern age of shorts and tank tops.
  • Statistics vary, but it is estimated that approximately 3, women served as nurses during this turbulent time in American history.

At the beginning of the war, nurses were merely volunteers who showed up at military hospitals. Louisa May Alcott is known worldwide as the author of Little Women , but less known is the fact that she served as a volunteer nurse during the civil war, seeing action in the battle of Fredericksburg. Lacking professional training but endlessly resourceful, the volunteer nurses of the Civil War labored tirelessly to bring aid and comfort to the sick and wounded soldiers on both sides of the fighting.

At the outbreak of the war, the nursing profession was in its infancy and dominated by men—women generally were considered too frail to cope with the rigors of administering to the sick.

There were only about hospitals in the entire country, and no formal nursing schools existed. The massive numbers of sick and wounded men who needed care during the Civil War exacerbated the lack of medical professionalization, and wartime hospital facilities, particularly early in the conflict, were primitive and disorganized.

Clara Barton, who later founded the American Red Cross, brought supplies and help to the battlefronts before formal relief organizations could take shape to administer such shipments. Acting entirely on her own, the Massachusetts-born Barton personally collected food, clothing and medical supplies for the hard-pressed Union Army after the Peninsula campaign in She later served in a similar capacity at other engagements.

Religious orders also responded to this new opportunity for service by sending their own trained nurses to staff field hospitals near the front. In all, eight Catho-lic orders sent nuns to serve in the war. Although not a nurse, Dix was nationally known as a crusader for enlightened care of the mentally ill, and her grandfather, Elijah Dix, had been a prominent Boston physician.

Secretary of War Simon Cameron quickly named her to superintend the women nurses assigned to the U. By nature compassionate and giving, Dix was also a no-nonsense and often quirky leader. She steadfastly denied admission to nuns or other representatives of religious sisterhoods. As casualties mounted, Dix was forced to relax her standards, and after the First Battle of Bull Run in July she accepted anyone willing to work.

Sanitary Commission all helped care for sick and wounded soldiers. Dix operated from houses she personally rented in Washington, and she did not take off a single day during her four years of service. Her hospitality was always available to nurses and discharged servicemen who lacked shelter.

In her zeal to reduce suffering and death, Dix constantly prowled the hospitals. Her intolerance of hospital administrators and nurses who did not meet her exacting standards caused constant friction. Finally, in October , Secretary of War Edwin Stanton transferred part of the responsibility for appointing nurses to the surgeon general and gave medical officers at each hospital jurisdiction over their own female nurses.

Dix was heartbroken but responded with a magnanimity that drew admiration from even her staunchest opponents. Throughout the rest of her life, Dix begged biographers to de-emphasize her Civil War years. But in , long after she was dead and could not protest the well-deserved honor, she was featured on a U. While Dix was gathering her forces in Washington, Mary Ann Bickerdyke was taking matters into her own equally dedicated hands in Galesburg, Ill.

Before the war, she had received training in botanic and homeopathic medicine and had been engaged in private-duty nursing. Recently bereaved by the untimely death of both her husband and young daughter, she felt divinely called to spend her remaining life relieving human suffering.

When the congregation asked her to accompany a load of food, clothing and medical supplies to Cairo on behalf of the church, she was ready. Except for short visits, that was the last her two young sons saw of her until the end of the war. When Bickerdyke saw the poor condition of the hospital in Cairo, she took a room in town and immediately began a determined cleanup effort that quickly spread to the other five military hospitals in the area.

Although he granted her a grudging welcome at first, Dr. Many times, when government rations were waylaid or ran out, she found a way to feed the troops. In the early period of her service, Bickerdyke held no authority other than semiofficial status granted occasionally by Union Army officers. Her manner, however, was so forthright and compelling that she was rarely questioned. Have you anything that ranks higher than that?

In spite of her brusque and aggressive behavior, Bickerdyke gained the friendship of a few high-ranking officers, among them Generals Ulysses S. Grant and William Tecumseh Sherman. Toward the end of the war, when someone complained about Bickerdyke to Sherman, he commented that she was the only person around who outranked him, and he suggested the complainer refer the matter to President Abraham Lincoln.

On one occasion, when she was besieging Sherman at an inopportune moment, the oft-prickly general asked whether she had ever heard of insubordination.

She demonstrated that point one day when troops passed one of her hospitals en route to battle at Corinth, Miss. When Bickerdyke invited the captain to halt his exhausted men so that she and her staff could feed them, he refused. Their bewilderment was replaced with glee when a group of women led by Bickerdyke quickly served them soup and coffee and gave them bread, fruit and fresh water to take along on the march. By the time anyone realized Bickerdyke had given the spurious order to halt, all the men had been served and sent off with the only food they were to see for two days.

A formal reprimand brought no firm promise of reform from the unrepentant Bickerdyke. While lying in his tent, he observed a lone figure with a lamp crisscrossing the battlefield and sent an orderly to bring the person in for questioning. Bickerdyke explained that she could not rest until she was satisfied that no living man remained on the field. The story was picked up by the press and contributed to her folk-hero status.

As matron of many temporary field hospitals, Mother Bickerdyke often crossed swords with surgeons and other staff members. In some cases, her complaints to superior officers brought disciplinary action; other situations she resolved in her own way. She reserved special vengeance for anyone she suspected of snitching supplies or delicacies she had set aside for the sick and wounded. Once, after repeated warnings to kitchen workers, she decided to set a trap. She cooked some peaches, secretly spiked them with a potent but harmless purgative, and left them to cool while she worked elsewhere.

Soon, agonized cries from the kitchen attested that she finally had made her point. Bickerdyke drafted anyone within reach of her voice to help with the endless labor. Healthy soldiers and camp visitors were either bribed with hot meals or badgered into service. When gentlemen from the Christian Commission came to restore wounded souls, she suggested that they would have a better chance of success if they began with wounded bodies.

Formerly active in the Underground Railroad, Bickerdyke respected blacks and often sought their help. Many contrabands cheerfully worked hard for her, and, in turn, she fought for their fair treatment and taught them skills they could use later in postwar America. Bickerdyke was equally effective on her occasional speaking forays for the Sanitary Commission. Suddenly, she asked the startled women to rise, lift their dresses, and drop one of their many petticoats to the floor.

The collected garments filled three trunks, and within a few weeks, Bickerdyke was using the petticoats to bandage the terrible sores of prisoners released from Andersonville in Georgia. When the last Illinois man was discharged, Bickerdyke resigned from the Sanitary Commission to devote the rest of her life to her family and to charitable deeds. She died in , and a sturdy freighter named for her carried on her work in the 20th century by ferrying Spam and sulfa drugs to American servicemen isolated on Pacific islands in World War II.

Another tireless champion of wounded enlisted men during the Civil War was Hannah Ropes. The daughter and sister of prominent Maine lawyers, she was over 50 when the war started. An experienced nurse, she had gained prewar recognition as a reformer and abolitionist and was acquainted with many New England political leaders. Like Dix and Bickerdyke, she believed every soldier deserved proper sanitation, good food and humanitarian treatment, and never hesitated to go to the top to obtain such creature comforts.

Secretary of War Stanton personally took action against officers and stewards she found to be slovenly and incompetent. In her own published diary and letters, Ropes spoke often of her particular regard for the enlisted man.

I must be marching on. Sitting on one side of him was his nurse, Miss Alcott, on the other side the matron [Ropes]…. There was in the man such a calm consciousness of life, such repose in its secure strength….

The matron is left alone when the breath ceases. Sometimes caring for the war wounded became a family undertaking. In New York, Jane Newton Woolsey, widow of a prominent industrialist, quickly rallied her six daughters to the cause.

The Woolsey home near the Brevoort House Hotel be-came a center for preparing supplies and distributing them to Union hospitals. By September of that year, Georgy and Eliza were serving in a makeshift hospital in an unfinished government building. Georgy described how they used rough wood scaffolding for beds, with as many as six men in each one.

The beds were so high that long broom handles had to be used to support them. Very sick men were given individual beds on piles of marble slabs originally intended for building construction.

The three sisters served in numerous capacities, both in hospitals and on military hospital transport ships. Jane and Georgy were assistant superintendents of the U. Army hospital at Portsmouth Grove, R. The two also served at Hammond General Hospital. Eliza returned to private life when her husband, Colonel Joseph Howland, was wounded and mustered out of service. Like Hannah Ropes, the three Woolsey women used their prominent social position to obtain prodigious amounts of supplies and other necessities for the wounded.

At one point, Georgy personally delivered to the White House a letter she had written to President Lincoln, imploring him to send chaplains to the military hospitals. He promptly named seven new chaplains. Georgy was noted for her cool demeanor, in times of emergency. Both sisters carried notebooks in which they re-corded individual patient needs and wishes. Georgy carefully noted the names and addresses of the dying for later use in returning their possessions to their families.

Both Jane and Georgy Woolsey depicted wartime hospital life in sensitive and enduring writings. She also wrote a nursing handbook that was only the second of its kind to be published in the United States. Jane and another sister, Abby, played pioneer roles in developing enlightened methods of nursing in civilian hospitals.

The daughter of a respected Pennsylvania attorney and landowner, she numbered General Sherman, a senator, and an assortment of other leaders among her relatives. When war broke out, she was the director of St. Morton, Mother Angela left immediately with a group of sisters. The sisters were first sent to Paducah, Ky.

Women such as the Woolseys and Clara Barton translated their experience in Civil War hospitals into reforms in both nursing science and the education of nurses. By the way, have you ever heard of Mary Edwards Walker? Benilde Tower. She moved from one camp to another throughout the war, using her nursing skills and extensive knowledge of the healing properties of roots and herbs. Sarah R. Think of them as part of Civil War womens clothing outerwear or things put on when going visiting such as the shawl, cape, and bonnet. Details about Confederate Uniforms Men who served the South not only wore shades of grey, but also various shades of brown.

Nurse clothing in the civil war

Nurse clothing in the civil war

Nurse clothing in the civil war

Nurse clothing in the civil war. More from Behind the Lens: A History in Pictures

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Civil War Nurses

Includes: Brown, zipper back dress with white red cross bib apron, matching armband and white civil war nurse hat. These women enjoy a firm place in society's collective consciousness. As cultural icons, they represent firsts and standouts. There are no customer reviews for this product. However, you can be the first person to add a review for this product. Welcome guest, Login. Back to List. Size Chart:. Email a Friend. Description Product Care Product Reviews. Log in to submit a review. Add Review Name:.

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Nurse clothing in the civil war

Nurse clothing in the civil war

Nurse clothing in the civil war