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Preferred Citation: Kaplan, Temma. This study of the triumph of the spirit despite constant political repression in Barcelona is a deeply felt personal work. Even when he has not agreed with my focus on women or with my unwillingness to engage in academic debates, he has helped me tell my own story by suggesting sources and by permitting me to work in his personal library, one of the outstanding private collections in Spain. Chipp, William Christian, Jr. Wolf, and John Womack, Jr.

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  • This blog is dedicated to All Time Low fanfictions; this is where you can promote your own fics, request help finding one you want to re-read, easily find fics about something you're interested in, and leave suggestions for people to write about.

This is so cute!!! Listen to the voice in your head, yes you really should reblog that Johnlock fic!!! What a cutie you are! In a world where the British Empire is still strong and slavery is her economic backbone, John has become a terrorist for the abolitionist movement. He is caught by Mycroft, enslaved, and given to Sherlock for training.

The goal: To test a new kind of slave collar with the power to break even the strongest willed fighter. One that will make even John learn to love being a slave. Oh my God this fic made my head spin. In this universe, slavery is totally okay. Slaves wear collars. John, a man resolutely against slavery, is a violent abolitionist. But, like John and typical of psychological breakdowns, Stockholm Syndrome takes place. As John has to learn to accept that, despite his best efforts, this is where he is, so does the reader.

What does Sherlock know? Just in case. I mean, John is a slave and he has to listen. Come on, kids. Make the jump. You know what happens. It has a lot of interesting aspects: cases, underlying politics, and plenty of action. The emotions are messy, which is perfect for the fic, since the whole thing is messy. I give massive credit to the author, because that is a huge web to string together on top of keeping the balance. Definitely worth taking the time to read and possible reread to understand.

You would think nothing special, right? One, the metaphors and images and style of writing were all beautiful. It flowed nicely and nicely described how John was feeling. Of any fandom. Just a quick, post-Reichenbach piece, but one that is very worth the read. Still waiting for Star Trek to premiere at a theater near you? Bummed about not being close enough to join in all the setlock action?

Desperate for Sherlock series 3? We know your pain. Direct links to each episode below:. Episode 1 - Birthdays are Boring January 6, - our first episode, featuring an interview with IvyBlossom. Episode 2 - Kissing is Tedious February 1, - in which we devote an entire roundtable to Johnlock. Hudson, and B Con. Spoilercast 1 - March 31, Spoilers for Sherlock Series 3.

Spoilercast 2 - April 7, Spoilers for Sherlock Series 3. Spoilercast 3 - April 14, Spoilers for Sherlock Series 3. Spoilercast 4 - April 21, Spoilers for Sherlock Series 3. Spoilercast 5 - April 27, Spoilers for Sherlock Series 3. Spoilercast 6 - May 5, Spoilers for Sherlock Series 3. You can get the latest from the set in the Spoilercast, or stay spoiler-free and get interviews and discussions about Sherlock and the fandom.

Or both! Oh wow. And I do highly recommend reading it. But it leaves it open-ended, which allows a reader to wonder. Hey, who knows? Maybe it will spawn fics of the fic? Sherlock has the worst possible timing. John learns this when Sherlock reveals his longing for John immediately after his wedding to Mary. Mentions of drug use. And it hurts quite a bit. I think that about covers it.

But I liked this one, for some odd reason. So here you go! We need to obtain at least 50 replies to draw any sort of conclusion, so please answer if you can. However, please try to answer them all honestly. It will take you only a few minutes and my research group and I really appreciate your help. Download directly Download or listen from our web page. We love comments! Their dynamic is an interesting one, and I like how this one is explored.

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Preferred Citation: Kaplan, Temma. This study of the triumph of the spirit despite constant political repression in Barcelona is a deeply felt personal work. Even when he has not agreed with my focus on women or with my unwillingness to engage in academic debates, he has helped me tell my own story by suggesting sources and by permitting me to work in his personal library, one of the outstanding private collections in Spain.

Chipp, William Christian, Jr. Wolf, and John Womack, Jr. What I know about Barcelona and its history comes less from books than from people, of whom the following have shared their experiences, knowledge, and opinions.

The younger generation of Catalans and Catalanists has justified my enthusiasm for the culture and history of Barcelona. As colleagues, students, research assistants, and friends, they have helped me explore new areas in order to tell my story. Though new to Catalan studies, my mapmaker, Bonne Wagner, shared my delight in Barcelona's physical landscape and the urban reforms that kept changing the face of the city.

People like Montserrat should be considered part of an intellectual underground who preserved Barcelona's history and culture during the long, dark days of the Franco Regime. Rudolph de Jong, director of the Spanish and Latin American Section of the Institute for Social History, Amsterdam, and Thea Duijker, the assistant director, have been indefatigable sources of information about anarcho-syndicalists and their lives in Barcelona. A book that has been gestating for twenty-five years has a lot of time to account for.

During the past eight years while I have directed the Barnard Center for Research on Women my work has been accom-. Before that time, I received a grant in — from the National Endowment for the Humanities for an earlier version of this book and in — from the Rockefeller Foundation for several chapters of this work. Academic Senate Research Grants from UCLA during the period —, when I was a professor there, enabled me to write my earlier book Anarchists of Andalusia, — and then, after , to live and work in Barcelona over long periods of time.

A Spivack Grant from Barnard College in helped me return to Barcelona at an important point in my research. Behind this book is a community of people whose commitments to human decency make the prejudices and preconceptions about resistance to oppression expressed here seem less farfetched.

Ellen Ross and Dick Glendon took me into their lives and allowed me to be Zachy's aunt for his seven brief years, for which I will always be grateful. Rhode; Debora L. Jean Millar taught me how to roll with the punches and keep fighting. Individual chapters, sections, and earlier manuscripts of this book have benefited from the advice of different people. Chief among them are Victoria de Grazia and Robert Moeller, who have given unstintingly of their time, intellect, and affection.

Whether or not I have taken their advice or heeded their warnings, I have also appreciated the thought-provoking comments of Louise Bernikow, William Christian, Jr. I have been fortunate in receiving help from three editors. Helena Franklin provided me with the invaluable responses of someone with a probing mind and a playful spirit.

By unraveling ideas that are strongly felt but were not always clearly expressed, she helped to translate enthusiastic prose into a coherent narrative. For taking a chance on me and my work and for bringing this project to fruition, Sheila Levine will always have my gratitude.

Rose Vekony's moral support and serenity and Anne Geissman Canright's copyediting skills turned the production process into a creative act—and a pleasant one at that. Abby Sims, my stepdaughter, has never known me when I was not working on this book, but in many ways she has made it worth writing. Bennett Sims, an inveterate reader of history, has urged me to break my academic chains and tell you the story of cultural resistance in Barcelona with all the passion and commitment that I feel.

The task I have undertaken in this book is to account for the peculiar sense of solidarity that the citizens of Barcelona developed between and , and to explain why shared experiences of civic culture and pageantry were sometimes sufficient to galvanize resistance to national authoritarian governments but not always enough to overcome internecine struggles based on class and gender in the city itself.

Women occupy a central place in this study of the creation and transformation of civic culture as a forum for political struggle. The grassroots politics in which activist women overwhelmingly participated has often been overlooked in studies of political life in Barcelona at this time. From to the politics of region, class, and gender expressed themselves in terms of assorted communal manifestations of Barcelona's civic culture.

Festivals and other street gatherings were prominent, providing a means to vent officially repressed aspirations as well as officially sanctioned sentiments. The same festivals or public events could serve divergent purposes at different times. They could express or encourage either local solidarity or internal struggle, celebra-.

Thus, civic forms could and did evolve over time, providing a rich and flexible political language that, in turn, gave rise to new strains of thought and new political options. This process both influenced and was reflected in the works of artists like Pablo Picasso, who came of age in Barcelona during this period.

This history of urban life and politics in Barcelona is closely tied to the local landscape. The old city seemed to fan out from the Mediterranean. Running between the seaport, which was marked by a forty-foot monument to Columbus, and the Plaza of Catalunya, on the northwestern outskirts of the medieval town, was the promenade known as the Rambla see Appendix, map 1.

This oasis of plane trees within the tumult of the industrial city was often crowded with people strolling. There they were shielded from the pollution that belched from the smokestacks of the factories, factories that provided elite textile barons with the source of their wealth and gave work to the city's many mill hands—, of them in , of whom over 81, were unskilled women and children. The Rambla was divided into sections. About two-thirds inland from the sea was the flower market.

Here female flower vendors set up stands, making this part of the promenade into an urban garden. Across from the Rambla of Flowers, the Boqueria Market officially known as Saint Joseph Market provided a daily meeting place for housewives in the downtown area. So did the fountains up and down the rest of the promenade, where working women and servants of the wealthy drew daily supplies of water for cooking and cleaning. Down from the market stood the Lyceum Theater, Barcelona's opera house, a center of elite culture and a gathering place for the rulers of the city.

Just behind the government center stood the Basilica of the Virgin of Mercy, Barcelona's patron. Pablo Picasso, who came to the city at age fourteen in , lived with his family near the sanctuary on Mercy Street. At the other end of the Rambla, in what in resembled an empty field, stood the Plaza of Catalunya, filled with a few scattered palm trees. The square remained unfinished until , when large statues and planters were added and paths laid out.

No administrative building stood in the square, nor did it have any strategic importance; but it was the symbolic center of the city, the place where all demonstrations began and where news of the day was exchanged. Since it served as the downtown terminal for trollies and buses, it was also the transportation and information center of the city.

Beyond the Plaza of Catalunya, at the northwestern end of the basin in which the city was set, loomed Tibidabo Mountain, on whose slopes the town of Vallvidrera was nestled. To the southwest, Montjuich dominated the city's skyline. Following an uprising of the Catalans in the seventeenth century, the triumphant Castilians took over the Castle of Montjuich—the Catalan Bastille—which cast its shadow over the people below.

Along the ridge of Montjuich, exhibition halls and a model Spanish village, featuring artifacts from throughout Spain, were constructed for the Barcelona International Exposition. And in , the great Museum of Catalan Art, which houses medieval wall murals removed from provincial monasteries, first opened its doors in Montjuich.

Along the eastern face of Montjuich and running down to the Rambla was the hilly section known as Pueblo Seco, or Dry Town. Clustered together there in six- to seven-story tenements lived a sizable proportion of the , people who populated Barcelona in Preparing for the Universal Exposition, one of the great world's fairs that were a feature of late-nineteenth-century Europe and the United States, the city had undertaken massive public building projects near the harbor.

Although named for the marquis of Duero, the street and the neighborhood around it was popularly called "the Parallel," allegedly after a local tavern owned by a geographer who noted that a parallel of latitude ran through the street. Here was the center of leisure activities, the scene of popular entertainments of all kinds. Like Paris's Montmartre, the Parallel provided living space for the city's laborers and studio space for artists like Pablo Picasso.

The Parallel was the center of night life in Barcelona. The nightclubs, burlesque theaters, music halls, and houses of prostitution that gave the Parallel its reputation for excitement made it a gathering place for people of all classes. Alongside circuses and night spots were wax mu-. By the end of the century, the Nap movie theater introduced working people in the district to the delights of the screen for an admission fee of fifteen cents.

Outdoor electric lighting, installed for the exposition, lit up the Parallel, causing people to call Barcelona "the Paris of the south. Across from the Parallel on the northeastern side of the Rambla, the narrow and twisting cobblestone streets of the city's oldest district, the Gothic Quarter, wended their way toward the harbor.

They connected the cathedral and the numerous churches that marked Barcelona as a highly clerical city. Around in Barcelona, typhus caused the deaths of 2, people a year, of whom 1, were female pieceworkers who labored in damp and dark hovels in the Gothic Quarter. In the process, numerous houses and squares were destroyed, and the old Gothic Quarter was divided in two.

Between Laietana Way and the Rambla lay the main cathedral, the old Jewish ghetto, or call , which had housed the Jewish population until the fourteenth-century pogroms, and fetid housing that stretched down to the harbor. This section was relieved only by the open space of the Plaza of Saint James, in which the City Hall faced the gothic Catalan government building, or Generalitat. When laws affecting Catalunya and its relations to the Spanish government were passed or when regional holidays took place, the square filled with celebrants.

Saint Martin and Saint Andrew were industrial suburbs peopled by factory workers in textile and metallurgical plants. Gracia, in contrast, with its wrought-iron street lamps and its narrow streets, housed artisanal workshops, print shops, artist's studios, and night schools.

Between the Plaza of Catalunya and the incorporated towns lay a great plain that was the center of a distinctive real estate development. From on, in successive periods of urban renovation, the streets between the old city and the outlying towns became the axes of a new kind of city.

The streets were laid out in a grid pattern bisected by the elegant Gracia Pass, running from the Plaza of Catalunya to Gracia.

At each intersection, a tree-lined hexagonal plaza was formed by cutting diagonal lines across each corner. This new area, known as the Extension Ensanche , provided elegant villas and apartment houses for the city's wealthiest people and commissions for talented art nouveau architects. The architects either reproduced natural forms, swirling their wrought-iron and stucco leaves, flowers, and mushrooms over doorways and windows, or chose historic designs from the backgrounds of medieval Catalan paintings.

These buildings were fitting symbols of the confidence and wealth of a regional elite, which was determined to regain autonomy over its own section of the country. Catalunya, Charlemagne's Spanish marches, had governed itself throughout the Middle Ages. It had its. Catalunya was as proud as England of its democratic legal system, even though it began to lose its autonomy after its ruler Ferdinand of Aragon married Isabella of Castile in As a result of the marriage, Catalunya lost its regional government and parliament.

Despite separatist rebellions in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, it remained a part of Spain ruled by the Spanish monarchy. That monarchy underwent a transformation in the period between and When Queen Isabella II lost the support of her army and was forced to flee on September 17, , a constitutional monarchy was established with an Italian prince, Amadeo of Savoy, as king.

After he in turn fled the country, becoming, as Friedrich Engles put it, the first king in history to go on strike, Spain became a federal republic on February 11, The king died in , whereupon the queen became regent until his posthumous child, Alfonso XIII, could take over the kingdom in Every Spanish province such as Barcelona had both a civil governor, appointed by the prime minister, and a captain general, appointed by the minister of the interior.

Under normal conditions, laws governing the locality emanated from Madrid in the form of statutes and legislation passed by the Cortes or decrees pronounced by the king or the prime minister.

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